Posts Tagged ‘British’

Our Father’s Day Gift Guide!

Monday, June 3rd, 2013

It’s hard to believe that it’s almost Father’s day already. That’s right, Father’s day is coming up right around the corner on June 16, which means that you have until June 10 to get those orders for dad in.  We’re told that fathers sometimes get the short end of the stick when it comes to the holiday. They’re given a tool as a gift and told to fix something, or given a grill and told to make everybody dinner. Not quite the restful, fun filled day they had in mind. Here at Pacific Merchants (a company owned by a dad, FYI) we’re going to make sure that doesn’t happen with this great Father’s Day Gift Guide.

Now, if you have an unlimited budget, we suggest you bookmark this page and run out and by your dad something really shiny and fancy, like this Tesla. It’s good for the environment (we try to keep things green at Pacific Merchants) and your dad will love it.

If you don’t have a spare $80,000 lying around, we’ve got some more wallet-friendly gift ideas that your dad is sure to love just as much as he’d love that fancy, shiny car. So let’s get it started.  And remember, when you check out, enter DADROCKS checkout! We’ll give you $5 bucks off your order of $30 or more!

 

Our first suggestion for celebrating dad: Throw him a party. It’s beautiful this time of year, so we suggest that you throw him a picnic or barbecue. If you really want to wow him, make sure to include personal touches. Set the table with placemats in his favorite colors. Our Laguna Placemats come in 12 vibrant, bright colors, and we’re sure that your dad’s favorite is among them. To make that barbecue even more special, we’re including our amazing brown sugar bourbon spice rub recipe. It’s amazing on ribs and pork loin, great on chicken, delicious on steak, and succulent on salmon. It’s also really good on hearty vegetables such as mushrooms, squash, carrots and peppers.  Scroll on down to the bottom of this post for the recipe

 

If your dad’s idea of a great Saturday is spending time at the grill cooking up a storm for family and friends, we’ve got some wonderful pieces for him. We’re highlighting serving dishes and accessories that the grillmaster in your life will go nuts for.  From Condiment serving sets to acaciawood plates (great for burgers) to amazing serving trays, we suggest that you help dad trick out his next barbecue with Acaciaware®barbecue supplies from Pacific Merchants!

 

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Round Condiment           Set of 4 7″ Plates            Wood Oval Tray                  12″ Calabash Salad Serving Set

 

s2525025250Another great gift for dad is our Mason Cash Mortar and Pestle. These high-quality earthenware Mortar and Pestles are made in a design that is based on the original high quality models produced over 200 years ago. Mason Cash Mortar and Pestles are the best way to crush and grind herbs and spices. Collectable Mason Cash Mortar and Pestles have no wooden parts to absorb flavor or stains. The special matte finish inside the bowl and on the pestle enables improved crushing and grinding.  With a wider than usual pestle is easier to use than a conventional one – just easy circular movements of the wrist are required.  The Mason Cash mortar pestle is highly collectable (when you can find them) and are considered the world’s finest!

 

 

Brown Sugar Bourbon Spice Rub Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 cups brown sugar
  • ½ cup white sugar
  • ½ cup kosher salt
  • 2 tbsp black pepper
  • 1 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper (more if your dad likes spicy food)
  • 1 tbsp cinnamon
  • 1 tsp cloves
  • 1 tbsp rubbed sage
  • 2 oz bourbon
  • ½ cup apple juice/apple cider
  • 2 oz apple cider vinegar

Instructions  – the long way for maximum flavor

  • Combine all ingredients in a bowl to make a thick paste.
  • Pour into a large ziptop bag or air tight plastic container large enough to fit meat/vegetables of choice.
  • Add meat/fish vegetable to marinade.
  • Marinate according to times below.
    • Ribs – 4 hours to overnight
    • Pork Loin – 2 to 4 hours
    • Flank Steak – 1 to 2 hours
    • Chicken – 1 to 2 hours
    • Salmon 30 minutes to an hour
    • Carrots – 1 to 2 hours
    • Squash – 1 to 2 hours
    • Mushrooms – 30 minutes to an hour
    • Peppers – 30 mintutes to an hour
    • After marinating, allow food to sit on a wire rack for 30 minutes so that the sugar mixture dries.
    • Grill over low heat to desired done-ness, keeping in mind that the bourbon will cause flare ups.
    • Brush any remaining marinade over meat in the last 10 minutes of cooking.
    • Once meat is finished cooking and your marinade has caramelized and formed a nice crust, remove from heat
    • Allow meat to rest 10 minutes before slicing and serving

Instructions – the quick way for more time with dad!

  • Combine marinade ingredients to form a paste
  • Salt and pepper your desired food
  • Grill over medium grill until almost done
  • Turn grill to low heat when food is about 10 minutes from done
  • Brush the marinade onto food for last 10 minutes of cooking. Be aware of flare-ups caused by bourbon.
  • Once your meat is done and your  marinade has caramelized and formed a nice crust, remove from heat
  • Allow meat to rest 10 minutes before slicing and serving.

From all of us here at Pacific Merchants Trading Company, we hope that your dad has a really happy father’s day, and we hope that whether you buy your dad a mortar & pestleor the Tesla, we were able to help make shopping for dad (or cooking for dad) a little easier.  Just remember to get those orders in by June 10 so that your father’s gift gets to him on time. And remember to enter DADROCKS at checkout!

 

Christmas is Coming, Guess Who’s Feeling Warm Inside!

Monday, November 14th, 2011

Royal Mason Cash Pudding BasinThe British Royal Christmas Pudding

Christmas Pudding is a big deal in Great Britain, even for the British Royal Household. For the past several years, Queen Elizabeth II has gifted hundreds of her loyal subjects, family and friends with Christmas Puddings prepared and presented in none other than Mason Cash pudding basins! We are proud to offer a brief and fascinating history of Christmas Pudding in the English tradition, and a tremendously long and deliciously overwrought recipe for same.

Happy Holidays!

Family recipes for Christmas Pudding are often closely guarded secrets, handed down from generation to generation. Many are based on the Royal family’s Sandringham recipe – rich with dried fruit and spices, some include nuts, grated apple or carrot – harking back to years when sugar was scarce.

The first Sunday in December is ‘Stir-up’ Sunday, the day when the best puddings are begun. It’s already time to roll up your sleeves and think about making the Christmas pudding. Some cooks go so far as to prepare it six months to a year in advance. In the old days, it was traditional for everyone in the house to come into the kitchen and give the batter a stir while making a wish. The puddings are cooked, cooled and tucked away in a dry place to wait for their final steaming on Christmas Day when they will be turned out onto a handsome dish, decorated with a sprig of holly and wreathed in blue flames from a generous dousing of warmed spirit.

It seems as if all of Fortnum and Mason’s stock goes into the recipe: currants, raisins, sultanas, almonds, candied fruit, ginger…. There may also be cherries and citron, or one of the two, or neither, depending on the recipe. Some chefs add to the mixture a diced russet apple and a grated carrot.

Tradition dictates that six objects be found in the pudding: two rings to bring love, a sixpence as a sign of prosperity, a trouser button for the bachelor, a thimble for the spinster, and a little pig who will determine the glutton at the table. The tradition of hiding silver coins in the pudding is a link to earlier days in English and Scottish courts when the leader of the Christmas revels was chosen on Twelfth Night by finding a bean hidden in the pudding

At the end of Christmas Day, after having listened to the Queen’s Christmas Message, the plum pudding is brought out to be enjoyed for tea on the stroke of five, as one raises a drop of port to toast the Queen!

The presentation is a festive affair. Dickens describes the arrival of the Christmas pudding in “A Christmas Carol”:

“Mrs. Cratchit entered, her face crimson, but smiling proudly, with the pudding resembling a cannon ball, all speckled, very firm, sprinkled with brandy in flames, and decorated with a sprig of holly stuck in the centre. Oh! The marvelous pudding!”

All guests receive a slice with a little dancing flame so that they can make a wish before it goes out.

Countrywide, brandy butter is served with the pudding alongside cream or custard, it’s a tradition that originated in Cumbria – where the best brandy butter is still made today, a delicious blend of butter, sugar and spirit with a hint of spice.

Ingredients

– 250 g (9 oz.) sultanas
– 250 g (9 oz.) seedless raisins
– 250 g (9 oz.) currants
– 10 g (2 tsp.) candied lemon zest
– 10 g (2 tsp.) candied grapefruit zest
– 20 g (4 tsp.) candied orange zest
– 20 g (4 tsp.) candied citron
– 125 g (4 oz.) candied cherries
– 60 g (2 oz.) blanched almonds
– 60 g (2 oz.) chopped almonds
– 500 g (18 oz.) chopped suet
– 250 g (8 oz.) rye bread crumbs
– 125 g (4 oz.) brown sugar
– 1/2 tsp. powdered cinnamon
– 1/2 tsp. grated nutmeg
– 1/2 tsp. ginger
– A pinch of salt
– 4 tbsp. brandy
– 250 ml (1 cup) milk
– 30 g (2 tbsp.) butter
– 6 large eggs, lightly beaten
– 125 g (4 oz.) flour
– 2 tbsp. baking powder

Brandy butter

– 250 g (9 oz.) unsalted butter
– 250 g (9 oz.) icing sugar
– 50 ml (2 oz.) brandy
– Grated zest of 1 orange (optional)

Method

Quick method (only 7 hours!)
1. Chop the raisins, currants, cherries, candied fruit and peel;
2. Place all the dry ingredients into a large non-reactive bowl and combine; add the other ingredients and mix until thoroughly blended;
3. Line a Mason Cash pudding basin with a large piece of cloth that has been buttered and floured on each side; pour the mixture into the basin and enclose by folding in the four corners of the cloth; top with a piece of buttered parchment; cover;
4. Place the pudding in the oven in a pan half-filled with water or in a steamer on the stove top; cook for 6 hours at a bare simmer, checking the water level from time to time;
5. Remove the pudding from the pan and let cool;
6. Cover with a fresh cloth and parchment; replace the cover or wrap in aluminum foil and let ripen in a cool spot (not refrigerated) for at least one month. It will be even better if it ages longer!
7. On Christmas Day, return the pudding to the oven or steamer (as described in step 4) for 3 to 4 hours; unmould;
8. Flambé with brandy or cognac and serve hot with brandy butter.

Longer method… 216 hours! (7 days macerating time)

1. Chop the raisins, currants, cherries, candied fruit and peel; pour 1 litre (4 c.) of rum over top and let sit for 48 hours; drain, reserving the rum;
2. Combine all the ingredients except the eggs; add 200 ml (generous 3/4 cup) of the reserved macerating rum and the juice of an orange and a lemon; cover the bowl with a cloth moistened with rum and let sit 7 days. Stir the batter once a day, adding a little rum if necessary to keep the batter soft;
3. If the batter becomes too stiff, thin it with a small glass of old ale; if the batter is too thin, add a little flour and mix gently; continue with the recipe (above). As adapted from worldwidegourmet.com

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Bake Hot Cross Buns this Easter!

Friday, April 1st, 2011

Hot Cross Buns have traditionally been eaten at Easter by Anglo Saxons for hundreds of years. Although the first recorded use of the term “Hot Cross Buns” dates back to 1733, many believe that the buns actually pre-date Christianity.

The Saxons, Eostre and Hot Cross Buns

While Easter is synonymous with the coming of Spring, baby animals, and (everyone’s favorite) egg hunts, Easter actually gets its name and from the German Goddess Eostre. Historians believe that Eostre was the German goddess of the dawn, and in some cases, was considered a “Spring-like fertility goddess.” Traditionally, Germans would celebrate Eostre by feasting throughout the month we now know as April. It is believed that Saxons ate Hot Cross Buns during these feasts, which were meant to symbolize the four quarters of the moon.

Eventually, the buns became highly popular throughout England, specifically during the Easter season. Protestant monarchs attempted to ban them due to an alleged tie to the Catholic church, but were unsuccessful due to their incredible popularity.

Superstitions Surrounding Hot Cross Buns

There are many superstitions that surround Hot Cross Buns. An English superstition states that buns that are baked and served on Good Friday won’t spoil or become moldy during the coming year, while another states that giving a bun to someone who is sick will help them to get better.

Legend also has it that by sharing a hot cross bun, two friends will be ensured friendship in the coming year as long as they say “Half for you, half for me, between us two shall goodwill be” while consuming the bun. Ships that carry Hot Cross Buns are supposed to ensure safety against shipwreck when carried on a boat, and kitchens that have a Hot Cross Bun hanging within them are supposedly protected against fires and ensured a perfect result when breads are baked (the hanging bun is supposed to be replaced annually).

Hot Cross Buns Recipe

Bun Ingredients:

  • 2 Tsp. Active Dry Yeast
  • 1/2 Cup 2% Milk (110-115º Fahrenheit)
  • 1 Tbsp Softened Butter
  • 1 Egg
  • 4 Tsp. Sugar
  • 1/4 Tsp. Salt
  • 1 1/2 Cups All-Purpose Flour
  • 2 Tbsp. Raisins
  • 2 Tbsp. Dried Currants
  • 1/4 Tsp. Ground Cinnamon
  • A dash of ground Allspice
  • 1 Egg Yolk
  • 1 Tbsp. Water

Icing Ingredients:

  • 1/4 Cup Confectioners’ Sugar
  • 1/8 Tsp. Vanilla Extract
  • 3/4 Tsp. 2% Milk

Directions:

  • In a small mixing bowl, dissolve the yeast in the warm milk. Stir in softened butter, egg, sugar and salt. Combine 3/4 cup of flour, currants, raisins, allspice and cinnamon; add to the yeast mixture and mix well. Stir in enough of the remaining flour to form a soft dough.
  • Turn onto a floured surface; knead until smooth and elastic, about four to six minutes. Place in a greased bowl, turning once in order to grease the top. Cover and let dough rise in a warm space until doubled– about one hour.
  • Punch dough down; shape into six two inch balls. Place balls two inches apart on a baking sheet coasted with nonstick cooking spray. Using a sharp knife, cut a cross on top of each bun. Cover and allow to rise until doubled– about 30 minutes.
  • Beat egg yolk and water; brush over buns. Bake buns at 375° Fahrenheit for 13-15 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on wire racks. Combine icing ingredients and pipe over buns.

Find Price & Kensington on One Kings Lane

Thursday, January 6th, 2011

We’re excited to announce that our Price & Kensington tea line is going to be featured in a sale on OneKingsLane.com. Beginning this Sunday, January 9th, One Kings Lane members will be able to shop an exclusive selection of Pacific Merchants’ Price & Kensington teapot gift sets at competitive prices.

Price & Kensington's red two-cup tea pot

Price & Kensington Tea-For-Ones on sale

Pacific Merchants has selected some of our favorites from our Price & Kensington collection for this One Kings Lane event, including our tea-for-ones. Tea-for-Ones are part tea cup, part tea pot, just the right size for a morning “spot of tea.” Whimsically decorated, our tea-for-ones are the perfect “little something” gift for teachers, secretaries and coworkers and include the high standard of quality that Price & Kensington has been known for for over 100 years.

Buy Price & Kensington Tea Sets

Also available in this exclusive One Kings Lane sale are our three piece, five piece and nine piece Price & Kensington tea sets. Our three piece tea set includes a six cup tea pot as well as a creamer and sugar bowl. Three piece Price & Kensington sets are available in black and white. Our five piece tea sets include a two cup tea pot, two tea caddies and two tea mugs while the nine piece tea set includes a six cup tea pot, four tea caddies and four tea mugs. Both the five piece and nine piece Price & Kensington tea sets are available in orange, yellow, red, blue, green and cobalt.

Shop One Kings Lane January 9-11

The Price & Kensington One Kings Lane sale starts Sunday, January 9th at 8 a.m. pacific (11 a.m. eastern) and continues until January 11th at 8 a.m. pacific. In order to take advantage of this exclusive sale, shoppers must register to become members of One Kings Lane- to complete the free registration click here. We hope you’ll join us and shop this wonderful Price & Kensington event!

Christmas is Coming… and Guess Who’s Getting Fat?

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

The Royal Christmas Pudding Basin by Mason Cash

The British Royal Christmas Pudding

Christmas Pudding is a big deal in Great Britain, even for the British Royal Household. For the past several years, Queen Elizabeth II has gifted hundreds of her loyal subjects, family and friends with Christmas Puddings prepared and presented in none other than Mason Cash pudding basins! We are proud to offer a brief and fascinating history of Christmas Pudding in the English tradition, and a tremendously long and deliciously overwrought recipe for same.

Happy Holidays!

Family recipes for Christmas Pudding are often closely guarded secrets, handed down from generation to generation. Many are based on the Royal family’s Sandringham recipe – rich with dried fruit and spices, some include nuts, grated apple or carrot – harking back to years when sugar was scarce.

The first Sunday in December is ‘Stir-up’ Sunday, the day when the best puddings are begun. It’s already time to roll up your sleeves and think about making the Christmas pudding. Some cooks go so far as to prepare it six months to a year in advance. In the old days, it was traditional for everyone in the house to come into the kitchen and give the batter a stir while making a wish. The puddings are cooked, cooled and tucked away in a dry place to wait for their final steaming on Christmas Day when they will be turned out onto a handsome dish, decorated with a sprig of holly and wreathed in blue flames from a generous dousing of warmed spirit.

It seems as if all of Fortnum and Mason’s stock goes into the recipe: currants, raisins, sultanas, almonds, candied fruit, ginger…. There may also be cherries and citron, or one of the two, or neither, depending on the recipe. Some chefs add to the mixture a diced russet apple and a grated carrot.

Tradition dictates that six objects be found in the pudding: two rings to bring love, a sixpence as a sign of prosperity, a trouser button for the bachelor, a thimble for the spinster, and a little pig who will determine the glutton at the table. The tradition of hiding silver coins in the pudding is a link to earlier days in English and Scottish courts when the leader of the Christmas revels was chosen on Twelfth Night by finding a bean hidden in the pudding

At the end of Christmas Day, after having listened to the Queen’s Christmas Message, the plum pudding is brought out to be enjoyed for tea on the stroke of five, as one raises a drop of port to toast the Queen!

The presentation is a festive affair. Dickens describes the arrival of the Christmas pudding in “A Christmas Carol”:

“Mrs. Cratchit entered, her face crimson, but smiling proudly, with the pudding resembling a cannon ball, all speckled, very firm, sprinkled with brandy in flames, and decorated with a sprig of holly stuck in the centre. Oh! The marvelous pudding!”

All guests receive a slice with a little dancing flame so that they can make a wish before it goes out.

Countrywide, brandy butter is served with the pudding alongside cream or custard, it’s a tradition that originated in Cumbria – where the best brandy butter is still made today, a delicious blend of butter, sugar and spirit with a hint of spice.

Ingredients

– 250 g (9 oz.) sultanas
– 250 g (9 oz.) seedless raisins
– 250 g (9 oz.) currants
– 10 g (2 tsp.) candied lemon zest
– 10 g (2 tsp.) candied grapefruit zest
– 20 g (4 tsp.) candied orange zest
– 20 g (4 tsp.) candied citron
– 125 g (4 oz.) candied cherries
– 60 g (2 oz.) blanched almonds
– 60 g (2 oz.) chopped almonds
– 500 g (18 oz.) chopped suet
– 250 g (8 oz.) rye bread crumbs
– 125 g (4 oz.) brown sugar
– 1/2 tsp. powdered cinnamon
– 1/2 tsp. grated nutmeg
– 1/2 tsp. ginger
– A pinch of salt
– 4 tbsp. brandy
– 250 ml (1 cup) milk
– 30 g (2 tbsp.) butter
– 6 large eggs, lightly beaten
– 125 g (4 oz.) flour
– 2 tbsp. baking powder

Brandy butter

– 250 g (9 oz.) unsalted butter
– 250 g (9 oz.) icing sugar
– 50 ml (2 oz.) brandy
– Grated zest of 1 orange (optional)

Method

Quick method (only 7 hours!)
1. Chop the raisins, currants, cherries, candied fruit and peel;
2. Place all the dry ingredients into a large non-reactive bowl and combine; add the other ingredients and mix until thoroughly blended;
3. Line a Mason Cash pudding basin with a large piece of cloth that has been buttered and floured on each side; pour the mixture into the basin and enclose by folding in the four corners of the cloth; top with a piece of buttered parchment; cover;
4. Place the pudding in the oven in a pan half-filled with water or in a steamer on the stove top; cook for 6 hours at a bare simmer, checking the water level from time to time;
5. Remove the pudding from the pan and let cool;
6. Cover with a fresh cloth and parchment; replace the cover or wrap in aluminum foil and let ripen in a cool spot (not refrigerated) for at least one month. It will be even better if it ages longer!
7. On Christmas Day, return the pudding to the oven or steamer (as described in step 4) for 3 to 4 hours; unmould;
8. Flambé with brandy or cognac and serve hot with brandy butter.

Longer method… 216 hours! (7 days macerating time)

1. Chop the raisins, currants, cherries, candied fruit and peel; pour 1 litre (4 c.) of rum over top and let sit for 48 hours; drain, reserving the rum;
2. Combine all the ingredients except the eggs; add 200 ml (generous 3/4 cup) of the reserved macerating rum and the juice of an orange and a lemon; cover the bowl with a cloth moistened with rum and let sit 7 days. Stir the batter once a day, adding a little rum if necessary to keep the batter soft;
3. If the batter becomes too stiff, thin it with a small glass of old ale; if the batter is too thin, add a little flour and mix gently; continue with the recipe (above). As adapted from worldwidegourmet.com

Mason Cash: The Enduring Nature of Simple Things Made Well

Sunday, August 30th, 2009

Some of Mason Cash's Most Famous Mixing Bowls

Mason Cash, a revered line of kitchenware favored by the British Royal Household, has returned to American shores this August, after several years’ absence. We at Pacific Merchants are thrilled to launch this British invasion as exclusive U.S. importer and distributor, and see this classic line as an opprtunity to exceed consumer expectations in a changing marketplace.

When I was a boy, my mother – a devotee of Julia Child’s PBS show – purchased a set of Mason Cash mixing bowls and pudding basins. When she used the bowls, she felt as if she were cooking with her culinary idol. I can’t tell you how many times I helped my mom mix batter in those bowls for scones, crepes, and Aunt Fanne’s famous fudge brownies.

I’m not alone in my memories. While rooted in over two hundred years of tradition, Mason Cash is ideally suited to today’s consumer, who yearns for products as functional and long-lasting as they are beautiful. First launched over 100 years ago, these products enjoy worldwide recognition and many have stayed within families for generations.

The origins of Mason Cash can be traced back to the heart of Derbyshire, England in around 1800. Mason Cash ceramics were made from ‘white and cane’ glazed earthenware, also known as ‘yellow ware’ due to the color of the local clay. The pottery was run by a series of Master Potters, of whom the most colorful was ‘Bossy Mason’. Tom Cash acquired the pottery in 1901, and renamed the company Mason Cash and Co.

The Mason Cash mixing bowl has met the test of time by combining both ergonomic and functional elements. My mom’s bowls were solid and well balanced, with raised ornamentation that made them easy to turn while whipping cream with sticky fingers, or folding egg whites into Dad’s favorite broccoli soufflé. One large bowl with a glaze the color of butterscotch sat year round on the kitchen table, brimming with fruit. Just the memory of it makes me think of apples in autumn and peaches in summer! Even more telling, is the fact that almost fifty years later, Mom still has most of those bowls in her possession. I was gratified that something of such simple beauty could also be so enduring.

Just as well-regarded and recognizable as the mixing bowls are Mason Cash’s traditional white “pudding basins”. Microwave and dishwasher safe, these rimmed bowls maintain a tight seal with plastic wrap and are ideal for steaming. Legendary for their clean lines and high quality, they even meet the exacting standards of the British Royal Household, which uses them for Christmas puddings! A full complement of cane bakeware completes the line, with square, rectangular and oval baking dishes that are fully oven, freezer, microwave and dishwasher safe. The versatility, quality and attractiveness of Mason Cash kitchenware make it a priceless investment for any kitchen.

A few weeks ago, my family and I prepared a big Sunday dinner with a brand new set of Mason Cash bowls, “bakers” and pudding basins. As my wife assembled eggplant parmigiana in the square 9 “ baking dish, I crushed garlic cloves for a tri-tip marinade with Mason Cash’s iconic mortar and pestle. My eldest daughter steamed broccoli in a 64 oz. pudding basin and arranged crudités in dainty ramekins, as the baby of the family whipped up a raspberry lemon cake batter and butter cream frosting in the 14” and 11.5” bowls respectively.

As the kitchen filled with the sights and sounds of cooking, I felt a distinct sense of homecoming. The bakeware and bowls may have been new but the moment was timeless. This beautifully crafted Mason Cash stoneware is destined to be enjoyed by my family, as we create a whole new set of memories. One day my children may even use these pieces to cook with their children!
For me, Mason Cash represents a return to fundamentals: kitchen essentials crafted with pride, and meant to last a lifetime.


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